Japanese Red Cross Society – Operations Update 1

Period covered by this Operations Update: 29 March – 12 April 2011
Operations Update n° 1Glide no. EQ-2011-000028-JPN – April 13,2011
The full PDF is available here http://www.jrc.or.jp/vcms_lf/JRCS_OperationsUpdate_1.pdf
below is a word version of the report for your  reference

* This is the first Operations Update Report issued by JRCS; IFRC has previously issued 5 Information Bulletins covering the period from11 to 28 March 2011 and are available on the IFRC Website.

 
 
JRC nurse gives care to Ms. Tsuyako ITO (84) in an evacuation center in Kamaishi, Iwate. JRCS has a field clinic in thispremise. 29 March © Olav Saltbones, Norwegian Red Cross/ Japanese Red Cross
Summary:
  • Although the focus during the first month has been on emergency healthcare and emergency relief distributions, in the coming weeks, the Japanese Red Cross Society (JRCS) will continue to placegreater emphasis on early recovery and restoration of social welfare services
  • A committee established to distribute the donations–comprising a number of major fundraisingorganizations, including the JRCS and prefecture governments of 15 disaster-affected prefectures
 Context and Background 
On 11 March 2011 at 05:46 (UTC) Japan wasstruck by an earthquake of a magnitude 9.0,depth 24km, with the epicenter off its north-east coast. The earthquake generated a devastating tsunami (up to 38m waves) on the Pacific coast, whose consequences in terms of death toll, injuries, economic damage and environmental damage are still being calculated. Lack of fuel and adverse weather conditions hampered initial relief efforts. As a result of the main quake and of the ensuing tsunami, Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant was damaged with consequent radiation leaks; as a result the

Government of Japan has created a 20 kilometer radius exclusion zone around that plant, and expended the evacuation to areas in Fukushima with high levels of accumulated radiation beyond the 20km radius.

A tsunami hit town in Rikuzentakata, Iwate © OlavSaltbones, Norwegian Red Cross/ Japanese Red Cross 

The Current situation
At the one month mark i.e. April 11, the number of confirmed dead was 13,127 and missing/unaccounted for totaled 14,348, with 4,793 people being treated for injuries. Within the three worst affected prefectures (i.e. Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima), 127, 817 persons remained in evacuation   centers, still displaced by the disaster. Most of them are staying in school compounds, which start a new school year next week, in over 1,000 centers. Aside from having to return to school with evacuees sharing their facilities, school opening will be disrupted for many school children, as over 7,000 schools were destroyed or significantly damaged. Many more displaced persons, whose homes were destroyed have found a place to stay, with friends and their extended families. Significant aftershocks continue to rock the affected area, and felt in Tokyo including a 7.1 on April 7 and 6.2 on April 11; these tremors  have resulted in electrical outages affecting millions, disruption of transport and caused additional  deaths and injuries. In an informal survey, which tried to gauge the psychological impact of what victims  felt were their three greatest concerns, in Miyagi Prefecture, 53% cited money (for living expenses),  50% cited work and housing was cited by 40%. A significant 55% said they continue to feel traumatized from the experience. 

Coordination and Partnerships. 

  The JRCS’s relief and early recovery program activities continue to direct program resources and humanitarian support via two coordinated channels: The first coordinated approach is that funding received from other sister national Red Cross or Red Crescent Societies are being used to fund a   variety of immediate relief and early recovery needs. The second major coordinated approach is that all other funds received from national or international donors (i.e. public, corporate, private, institutional etc) by the JRCS will be programmed into the cash grants program. The cash grants program is managed by the “Grant Disbursement Committee” appointed by the national government. Proceeds from national fundraising campaigns in Japan have traditionally been channeled to a single fund, with the allocations to affected prefectures being made by the committee. The JRCS, the Central Community Chest of Japan and Japan national broadcaster, NHK are the main fundraisers. This distribution committee is joined by three academics as well as local government representatives from the 15 affected prefectures.  Once the distribution to prefectures is made to prefectures and municipalities, local government level committees, whom the JRCS is also a member at the chapter level will identify beneficiaries and distribute the money as agreed. The aforementioned meeting, held on Friday 8 April, called by the Ministry of Social Welfare, was the first round of distribution    

The JRCS’s relief and early recovery program activities continue to direct program resources andhumanitarian support via two coordinated channels: The first coordinated approach is that fundingreceived from other sister national Red Cross or Red Crescent Societies are being used to fund avariety of immediate relief and early recovery needs. The second major coordinated approach is that allother funds received from national or international donors (i.e. public, corporate, private, institutional etc)by the JRCS will be programmed into the cash grants program. The cash grants program is managedby the “Grant Disbursement Committee” appointed by the national government. Proceeds from national

fundraising campaigns in Japan have traditionally been channeled to a single fund, with the allocations

to affected prefectures being made by the committee. The JRCS, the Central Community Chest of

Japan and Japan national broadcaster, NHK are the main fundraisers. This distribution committee is

joined by three academics as well as local government representatives from the 15 affected prefectures.

Once the distribution to prefectures is made to prefectures and municipalities, local government level

committees, whom the JRCS is also a member at the chapter level will identify beneficiaries and

distribute the money as agreed. The aforementioned meeting, held on Friday 8 April, called by the

Ministry of Social Welfare, was the first round of distribution.

2

 

Japanese Red Cross Society Action
Progress towards outcomes
The tables below summarize action taken to date by sector.
Emergency Health Activities
Outcome: The immediate health needs are met and health risks posed by the emergency arereduced of the affected population through the provision of first aid, psychosocial andemergency medical servicesOutputsActivities plannedTarget population is·Mobilization of JRCS medical teams and establishment of fieldprovided with medical careclinics and dERU operational stationsservices related to injuries·Provision of heath care by mobile medical teams

and diseases·Provision of first aid and referral services

Target population and·Provision and scale-up of psychosocial support (PSP) to victims

National Society staff andaffected by the emergency

volunteers are provided·Provision of PSP to staff and volunteers of national societies and

with psychosocial supportmunicipal office engaged in emergency response.

Strengthen preventive·Undertake rapid assessments, as required, to identify gaps in

measures of infectiousenvironmental health (e.g. water supply) at evacuation centers

diseases within evacuation·Installation of hand washing facility in evacuation centers

centers

Progress to date:

  • · 452 medical teams have been mobilized from the JRCS nationwide network of 92 hospitals. 26 teams

    are currently operating in the three worst affected prefectures of Miyagi, Fukushima and Iwate providing

    mobile clinic services to the evacuation centers and a further 151 teams are being prepared for further

    deployment – in total 4,000 staff will be involved.

  • · As of April 12, 34,430 patients have been treated by JRCS.
  • · Radiation medical specialists from Hiroshima & Nagasaki Red Cross Hospitals have been sent to and

    stationed in Fukushima.

  • · In Ishinomaki area, Miyagi prefecture, the JRCS established a psychological support centre at the Red

    Cross hospital five days after the disaster to aid grieving families. To date 16 PSP trained medical team

    members and 8 specialized psychosocial (PSP) teams have provided PSP support to 919 persons who

    have suffered loss of family member and trauma from multiple disasters and support to medical care

    providers and municipal staff have also been provided with PSP support.

  • · In the Yamada, Kamaishi and Rikuzentakata areas of Iwate prefecture, a PSP outreach services have

    been provided to traumatized disaster victims at the evacuation centers; a total of 513 people have been

    provided support by 34 PSP trained medical team members. Further 176 people have been provided

    support in Aizu-Wakamatsu in Fukushima prefecture.

  • · 12 water bladders and tap stands are sourced and being set up in evacuation centers, while 500 Air

    Purifiers procured and distributed to the evacuation centers for infection control purpose.

  • · JRCS dERU and DMAT teams have augmented the capacity of Ishinomaki Red Cross Hospital, which

    provides tertiary medical care to 300,000 people in surrounding areas.

Operational gaps, challenges or constraints:

  • · The psychological toll on those who survived the disaster is presenting major challenge and the JRCS

  continues to strengthen its efforts to provide psychosocial support.

  • · The threat of a worsening radiation situation in the Fukushima Prefecture remains a worrisome risk to

  Red Cross staff and care providers. The JRCS has provided dosimeters, protective gear, and masks for

  the medical relief team working there and a Geiger counter to Fukushima Chapter and 1,000 iodine

  tablets ready for medical and relief staff if required.

3

 

Relief Distribution
Outcome: Provision of relief materials to the affected population in evacuation centers andequipment to care givers to reduce suffering to those who have lost their homes and livelihoodsOutputActivities plannedTarget population is· Provision of food and non-food itemsprovided with basicnecessitiesProgress to date:
Emergency materials, equipment and food items distributed to evacuees to date include: ü 131,510 blankets ü 183,000 pieces of clothing ü 28,362 Emergency Relief kits ü 12,500 sleeping kits ü 5,000 brooms ü 2,000 shovels

 ü 4,980 dustpans

 ü 3,500 scrub brush

 ü 4,900 buckets

 ü 15,000 towels

 ü 5,040 brushes

 ü bin liner 20,000 pcs

 ü 10,000 hand sanitizer

 ü 10,000 masks

 ü Rice: 11.2 mt

 ü Instant Meals: 4,000 meals

 ü Instant Noodles: 57,000

Operational gaps, challenges or constraints:

  • · The JRCS relief plan that included the sourcing and procurement of a variety of food and non-food

  items was not implemented as initially planned, as the local governments have received significant

  donations from the private sector, NGOs and public to meet most food and nonfood needs.

Early Recovery Activities
Outcome: Basic asset replacement and transitional shelter needs of target population are metOutputActivities plannedAssist victims from· Provision of basic household itemsevacuation centers into· The first 50 billion yen (US$600 million) cash distribution beingtransitional sheltersplanned from donations
Assist disaster victims withcash grants assistance tomeet their immediate needsProgress to date:

  • · A decision has been made by the Grant Disbursement Committee to make the following cash grant

   distributions: 1) Victims who have lost immediate family members will receive 350,000 Yen (US$4200)

   per a dead or missing member; 2) Households whose residences were destroyed by the earthquake,

   tsunami or resulting fires–about 46,000 -will receive 350,000 yen (US$ 4200) each; 3) Households

   whose homes were severely damaged–about 10,000–will get 180,000 yen (US$2160) each. About

   65,000 households located within 30 kilometres of the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant that have been

   told to evacuate will receive 350,000 yen each. The committee is treating these people as if their homes

   were destroyed, regardless of any damage actually sustained.

  • · JRCS will equip up to 70,000 transitional shelters with a package of six essential home appliances,

   comprised a refrigerator, washing machine, rice cooker, microwave, hot water dispenser and television.

4

 

The assistance – worth an estimated US$160 million and benefiting approximately 280,000 people – ispart of JRCS efforts to replace assets lost or destroyed by the March 11 disaster. The first 36government-built transitional shelters have been turned over to tsunami victims in Rikuzentakata, Iwateprefecture on April 8, along with the appliance sets to each prefabricated house.
Operational gaps, challenges or constraints:

  • · After the March 11 earthquake, many people evacuated to other prefectures, and several municipal

  administrations in affected areas lost tracking whereabouts of evacuees. This could make it difficult to

  deliver the support to disaster victims.

  • · Two potential constraints to meet ambitious construction schedules (i.e. complete approximately 60,000

  temporary shelters within five months) remains the lack of adequate building materials and the need to

  identify available land on which to build the transitional shelters.

Support and Strengthen Social Welfare Services
Outcome: Essential social welfare services to the most vulnerable groups including children,the elderly and the disabled, are normalizedOutputActivities plannedStrengthen community and· Provision of manpower to meet increased needs in servicesocial welfare servicesprovision.                                     · Provision of medical beds for elderly/disabled people in GeriatricImprove municipal transportHealth Service Centres and Special Elderly Nursing home

capacity to assist most· 500 Vehicles for social welfare facilities and community services

vulnerable groupsbeing considered

Progress to date:

  • · Medical beds for elderly/disabled people in Geriatric Health Service Centres and Special Elderly

   Nursing home are being sourced

  • · Rapid assessment is being conducted and caregivers are being sourced.
  • · Volunteer Action – A total of 13,952 JRCS volunteers, comprising 529 local RC Teams have

   participated in a variety of activities from March 11 to April 10. In the absence of public services

   these volunteers were involved in the following social and emergency service activities:

     ž Mobile kitchen (hot meal/soup distribution)

     ž Distribution of an food and non-food items

     ž Fundraising related activities to assist earthquake and tsunami victims

     ž Directing affected persons to the evacuation centers

     ž Management and support to volunteer centers

     ž Assisting home owners and communities clean mud away from their property

     ž Assisting affected JRCS chapters

  • ·Four volunteer centers have been setup (Tokyo HQ, Miyagi Chapter, Iwate Chapter and Fukushima

     Chapter) to coordinate the trained volunteer work/activities. Volunteers continue to assist in a variety of

     ways, including cleaning houses and supporting distribution and non technical support to medical

     services teams.

Restoring Family Links (RFL)
Outcome: Assist people seeking to restore contact with family members affected by theearthquake tsunami and/or nuclear power plant disastersOutputActivities plannedStrengthen JRCS RFL· Carry out assessments as requiredtechnical capacity· Increase database of missing persons                              · Carry out training of JRCS staff and volunteers in RFLImproved database for

missing will be in place

5

 

Progress to date:

  • · Restoring Family Links (RFL) database has 5,786 entries of missing persons – including 1,738

   Japanese and 4,048 foreigners.

  • · On April 4th, the JRCS sent the field team to the affected area in Miyagi Prefecture to initiate a pilot

   project. The team plans to provide internet services and helps register in the RFL website-register the

   name and coordinates of the missing person and their condition in those evacuation centers.

  • · A half-day RFL seminar for trainers of volunteers was organized on March 27th with support of the

   ICRC. Three JRCS staff and six volunteers took part in this seminar.

Communications – Advocacy and Public Information
Two communications delegates seconded by the International Federation have focused on getting visibilityfor the efforts of the Japanese Red Cross Society, including human interest stories, photographic and videocontent to document the activities and response stories of JRCS staff, volunteers and camp residents.Dozens of interviews have taken place with English, German, Swedish, French and language networks,including BBC, CNN, and Al Jazeera.
How we work
All Japanese Red Cross Society and IFRC assistance seeks to adhere to the Code of Conduct forthe International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and Non-Governmental Organizations(NGO’s) in Disaster Relief and the Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in DisasterResponse (Sphere) in delivering assistance to the most vulnerable.
The Japanese Red Cross Society, as a member ofthe IFRC, vision is to inspire, encourage, facilitateand promote at all times all forms of humanitarianactivities, with a view to preventing and alleviatinghuman suffering, and thereby contributing to themaintenance and promotion of human dignity andpeace in the world.
The Japanese Red Cross Society and IFRC’s work isguided by Strategy 2020 which puts forward threestrategic aims:1. Save lives, protect livelihoods, and strengthen    recovery from disaster and crises.2. Enable healthy and safe living.3. Promote social inclusion and a culture of non-

    violence and peace.

Contact information
For further information specifically related to this operation please contact

  • ·Naoki Kokawa, Deputy Director General International Department, Japanese Red Cross Society

     Office Phone +81-3-3437-7088 ; Email: n-kokawa@jrc.or.jp

  • ·Satoshi Sugai, Director of National Disaster Management Division, Disaster Management and Social

     Welfare Department, Japanese Red Cross Society

     Office Phone + 81 -3-3437-7084; Email: s-sugai@jrc.or.jp

For setting up interviews, please contact:In Japan:

  • · Sayaka Matsumoto, Public Relations and Media Officer, Japanese Red Cross Society

     Mobile: +81 90 6128 9100 E-mail: s-matsumoto@jrc.or.jp

  • · John Sparrow, Communications Delegate, IFRC

     Mobile: +81 80 3713 7324 E-mail: john.sparrow@ifrc.org

6

 

PHOTOS
Home visit by JRCS medical teams in Rikuzentakata, Iwate© Olav Saltbones, Norwegian Red Cross/ Japanese Red Cross
JRCS nurse gives care to Ms. Tsuyako ITO (84)in an evacuation center in Kamaishi, Iwate. JRCShas a field clinic in this premise. 29 March © OlavSaltbones, Norwegian Red Cross/ Japanese RedCross
JRCS Volunteers helping to clear the mud in a local shop inIwanuma, Miyagi. 30 March © Olav Saltbones, Norwegian RedCross/ Japanese Red Cross
Ms. Yamada and her two daughters were oneof the first 36 families to move into prefabtransitional shelters © Kathy MuellerIFRC/Japanese Red Cross
Home appliances provided by the JRCS to the first 36 prefabshelters completed in Rikuzentakata, Iwate© Japanese Red Cross
7

 

Donations
Donations received from individuals/corporate inside and outside Japan = USD1.4 billion
While no international appeal has been launched, the Japanese Red Cross Society is receiving cashcontributions from other National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies in the spirit of solidarity.As of 12 April, this amounted to 10 billion yen (approx. equivalent US$118 million):
A.
Donation Received    Society Name
1 American Red Cross
23
American red CrossCanadian Red CrossRepublic of KoreaNational Red CrossRepublic of KoreaNational Red CrossRepublic of Korea

National Red Cross

Cambodian Red Cross

Society

Red Cross of Serbia

Taiwan Red Cross

Organization

Taiwan Red Cross

Organization

Thai Red Cross Society

Thai Red Cross Society

Thai Red Cross Society

Thai Red Cross Society

Red Cross Society of

China

Ezhou Branch

Red Cross Society of

China

Red Cross Society of

China

Red Cross Society of

the Democratic People’s

Republic of Korea

German Red Cross

Tonga Red Cross

Tonga Red Cross

Tonga Red Cross

Bahamas Red Cross

Palestine Red Crescent

French Red Cross

French Red Cross

Red Cross of Viet Nam

Red Cross of Viet Nam

Red Cross of Viet Nam

Red Cross of Viet Nam

Malaysia Red Crescent

Monaco Red Cross

Rwanda Red Cross

Russian Red Cross

  DateCurrency Amount Received CurrencyReceivedRate2011/3/30USD10,000,00082.48
2011/4/112011/3/17
2011/3/23
2011/3/30
2011/3/17
2011/3/25 2011/4/7
2011/3/15
2011/3/172011/3/31 2011/4/4 2011/4/8 4/8/2011
USDCADJPY
JPY
JPY
USD
USDUSD
USD
USDUSDUSDUSDUSD
JPYUSD
USD
USD
 50,000,000 12,000,000246,539,778
411,362,653
733,455,478
19,982
   850,00014,900,000
100,000
   99,9752,000,0001,000,000  999,9732,897,469
1,238,748  151,851
760,760
100,000
85.16
1.00
1.00
1.00
79.31
81.0385.47
79.31
79.3183.1584.1285.1785.17
 1.0081.04
80.93
80.90
Amt Rec. JPY
824,800,000
4,258,000,0001,065,960,000  246,539,778
411,362,653
733,455,478
1,584,772
   68,875,5001,273,503,000
7,931,000
  7,929,017166,300,000 84,120,000 85,167,700246,777,507
 1,238,74812,306,009
61,568,327
8,090,000
4
56
7
8
2011/3/22
3/24/2011
2011/3/25
9
1011
121314
15
16171819
2011/4/112011/3/282011/3/28 2011/4/52011/3/22 2011/4/42011/3/31

2011/4/11

2011/3/22

2011/3/25

2011/3/25

 2011/4/4

 2011/4/7

2011/4/11

2011/3/30

2011/3/24

EURJPYJPYJPYUSDUSDEUR

EUR

JPY

JPY

USD

JPY

USD

EUR

JPY

USD

    10,282 8,695,650 2,058,450   690,200     5,000     9,992 1,389,960

   772,250

 4,028,802

11,882,821

   200,000

49,168,980

 1,000,000

    35,358

 8,183,902

   758,367

122.81  1.00  1.00  1.00 81.04 84.12117.52

122.81

  1.00

  1.00

 81.03

  1.00

 85.47

122.81

 82.48

 80.93

  1,262,759  8,695,650  2,058,450    690,200    405,200    840,563163,348,099

 94,840,022

  4,028,802

 11,882,821

 16,206,000

 49,168,980

 85,470,000

  4,342,414

  8,183,902

 61,374,641

8

 

B.
Russian Red Cross       TotalHard Pledge    Society Name
2011/3/31
USD
215,142
83.15 YEN
    17,889,05710,096,197,049
  DateReceived
Currency
HKDUSD
EUREURUSD
Amount Pledged
30,000,000   100,000
 1,000,00010,000,000   500,000
1 Hong Kong Red Cross2 Alwaleed Bin Talal  Foundation3 Finnish Red Cross4 ECHO5 Singapore Red Cross
9

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